Ostrich

You are here

Animal File

Common Name:
Ostrich
Scientific Name:
Struthio camelus
Size: 2 - 2.8m
Weight: Up to 145 kg
Birds
Herbivores
Native to Africa
Desert
Savannah

Conservation Status

Least concern

The world’s largest bird, the ostrich can reach 2.8 metres in height and has a kick so powerful it can kill a human or an adult lion if threatened.   Other predators include leopards, spotted hyena and wild dogs.  These impressive birds are also hunted for their meat, skin and feathers.  Their massive eyes, 5 centimetres across, help the to spot predators in the distance.

An ostrich can live up to 40 years and can produce an average of 60 eggs per year.  All the females in the group lay in the dominant female’s nest and males and females take turns at incubation for 35 – 45 days.  The males sit on the eggs at night as they cannot be seen in the dark, whereas the females’ lighter colouring provides better camouflage during the day.  The eggs are 15 cm in length and weigh the equivalent of 24 normal hens’ eggs.

In the Zoo, the ostriches are fed a diet of special ostrich mix, cabbage and apples.

Buy online & save

More ticket types

Children under three are free!

Meal Deal

We’re open!!

Visitor numbers will be limited each day and we advise all visitors to book online to guarantee entry. 
Please ensure you choose the correct date as tickets are non-refundable and dates can not be changed.

Groups of more than 6 visitors will not be permitted to enter the zoo. 
This applies to visitors of all ages, including under 3s. Exceptions apply only if everyone in your group live together in the same household or are part of a support bubble.

A face mask or face covering must be worn in all indoor areas of the zoo.
Exceptions apply only if you declare that you have a government listed exemption or are under the age of 11.

This is in accordance with current Government restrictions and laws, specific to England. You may be refused admission if you attempt to visit the zoo in a group of more than 6 or without a face covering and don’t declare a valid exemption.

You can find out everything we're doing to keep our visitors, staff and animals safe here.